Does the Library have my textbook?

At the beginning of the semester we have many students coming to the Library searching for textbooks and other curriculum materials. Here area few things for students and faculty to keep in mind about what the Library can and cannot offer:

  • The Library does not purchase and circulate textbooks in conjunction with course offerings. Certain textbooks may incidentally be in our collection, but this is fairly uncommon. If we do happen to have a textbook being used in a current class, there will most likely be only one circulating copy.
  • Textbooks can also occasionally be found in other library collections via the I-Share catalog, in which case students can request them for inter-library loan just like any other I-Share materials. However, please keep in mind that many schools have restrictions on lending out textbooks so requests for them can be slow to fulfill or even denied. Also, there’s a decent chance that several other students will request the same item, in which case only the first request will be fulfilled. As with any materials requested in I-Share, it’s always a good idea to follow the request’s progress by logging into your account.
  • If your teacher has informed you that curriculum materials are on course reserve, those items will be available for pickup from the circulation desk. More information on course reserve can be found here.
  • Teaching faculty interested in submitting materials for course reserve should visit Special Services for Faculty & Staff.

If you have any questions, please stop by the reference desk on the 1st floor or call us at 773-442-4410.Textbooks

Library awarded Muslim Journeys Bookshelf collection; hosting reading and discussion series

The Ronald Williams Library is one of 840 libraries and state humanities councils across the country to receive the Bridging Cultures Bookshelf: Muslim Journeys, and one of 125 libraries to also receive the Let’s Talk About It: Muslim Journeys grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the American Library Association (ALA). The Bookshelf programming aims to familiarize public audiences in the United States with the people, places, history, faith and cultures of Muslims in the United States and around the world. The books and films comprising the Bookshelf were selected with the advice librarians and cultural programming experts, as well as distinguished scholars in the fields of anthropology, world history, religious studies, interfaith dialogue, the history of art and architecture, world literature, Middle East studies, Southeast Asian studies, African studies, and Islamic studies. All the 25 books and 4 films are available at the library. To see the full schedule of events, go to http://libguides.neiu.edu/muslimjourneys.

As part of the Bookshelf grant, the Library partnered with the Angelina Pedroso Center for Diversity and Intercultural Affairs at NEIU to offer public showings and discussions on two of the films from the Bookshelf, Koran by Heart (2011) and Prince Among Slaves (2007), and a public talk and discussion by NEIU Professor of Anthropology, Russell Zanca, on Ornament of the World: How Muslims, Jews, and Christians Created a Culture of Tolerance in Medieval Spain, by Maria Rosa Menocal.

Let’s Talk About It programming includes a five-part reading and discussion series titled focused on those books in the Points of View theme, led by Alicia Erian, Assistant Professor of English and author of two books–a collection of short stories called The Brutal Language of Love, and the novel Towelhead, a coming-of-age story about an Arab-American adolescent experiencing racism, abuse, and her own sexuality, which was made into a film by Alan Ball in 2008.  Her third book, a memoir called The Dragon Lies Down, will be published in 2014.

The books that will be discussed include:

  • In the Country of Men by Hisham Matar
  • Dreams of Trespass by Fatima Mernissi
  • Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood by Marjane Satrapi
  • House of Stone by Anthony Shadid
  • Broken Verses by Kamila Shamsie

The first book discussion will focus on In the Country of Men by Hisham Matar and will be held on Thursday, September 19 at 5:30pm at the Ronald Williams Library, 5500 N. St. Louis Ave. For details and to register for the discussion series, please visit http://libguides.neiu.edu/muslimjourneys or contact Kimberly Shotick at kc-shotick@neiu.edu or (773) 442-4415. Additional books will be discussed throughout the year at Ronald Williams Library and Skokie Public Library. Registered participants of the discussions can check out copies of each of the books at the Ronald Williams Circulation Desk.

The Bridging Cultures Bookshelf is a project of NEH, conducted in cooperation with the ALA Public Programs Office, with support from the Carnegie Corporation of New York. Additional support for the arts and media components was provided by the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Arts.

New Library database: Education in Video

The Library is pleased to announce the acquisition of a new database developed specifically for training and developing teachers. Education in Video has over 1,300 hours of teaching demonstrations, lectures, documentaries, and primary-source footage of students and teachers in actual classrooms. Videos are browseable by education level, name and topic, and stream directly into your browser. Visit their about page for more information.

Education in Video

Film collection highlight: “A Film Unfinished”

As the Library’s film collection continues to grow we will be periodically highlighting works that illustrate the breadth of materials available to faculty and students. This time University Archivist and History Librarian Dario Villa discusses Hersonski’s 2010 documentary, A Film Unfinished.

The visual record of the Holocaust is extensive and well represented in both the photographic and filmic formats. Stored in a concrete vault for more than fifty years in East Germany, “Das Ghetto”, (various reels) is representative of the power of Nazi propaganda depicting the Warsaw Ghetto in 1942. An additional reel of outtakes was discovered in 1968 showing scenes filmed repeatedly by the German film crew. In “A Film Unfinished”, Israeli director Yael Hersonski screens all reels of the silent film, “Das Ghetto”, interspersed with additional comments from survivors, from diaries discovered after the war and from one of the Nazi cinematographers. It is a moving and disturbing depiction of the horrible suffering of the victims trapped in the ghetto, the majority destined to be deported to the death camps at Treblinka and Auschwitz. The viewer is seeing human beings destined to be murdered. A number of the survivors, at the time children, were invited by Hersonski to bear witness to the film and to comment on what they experienced. The most poignant testimony though, is by the silent stares of those who are doomed to perish at the hands of their oppressors. It remains unclear whether “Das Ghetto” was ever used by the Propaganda Ministry, though Hersonski thinks that it was filmed for the purpose of “educating” future German generations. As Hersonski said in an interview, this is “an exploration of the testimonial value of the cinematic image and of footage that was shot during times of war”.

Dario Villa – University Archivist/History Bibliographer

A Film Unfinished is available for checkout from the Library in DVD format. Our entire browse-able collection of popular and educational films can be found on the Library’s 3rd floor.

Afilmunfinished01

New Library database: Black Studies in Video

The Library is pleased to announce the acquisition of an exciting new database, Black Studies in Video. This collection features award-winning documentaries, newsreels, interviews and archival footage surveying the evolution of black culture in the United States. The wide range of topics covered includes African American history, politics, art and culture, family structure, social and economic pressures and gender relationships. More information can be found here.

bsv

This is just one of several recently purchased databases that we will be highlighting over the coming weeks. Stay tuned…

 

Does the Library have my textbook?

At the beginning of the semester we have many students coming to the Library searching for textbooks and other curriculum materials. Here area few things for students and faculty to keep in mind about what the Library can and cannot offer:

  • The Library does not purchase and circulate textbooks in conjunction with course offerings. Certain textbooks may incidentally be in our collection, but this is fairly uncommon. If we do happen to have a textbook being used in a current class, there will most likely be only one circulating copy.
  • Textbooks can also occasionally be found in other library collections via the I-Share catalog, in which case students can request them for inter-library loan just like any other I-Share materials. However, please keep in mind that many schools have restrictions on lending out textbooks so requests for them can be slow to fulfill or even denied. Also, there’s a decent chance that several other students will request the same item, in which case only the first request will be fulfilled. As with any materials requested in I-Share, it’s always a good idea to follow the request’s progress by logging into your account.
  • If your teacher has informed you that curriculum materials are on course reserve, those items will be available for pickup from the circulation desk. More information on course reserve can be found here.
  • Teaching faculty interested in submitting materials for course reserve should visit Special Services for Faculty & Staff.

If you have any questions, please stop by the reference desk on the 1st floor or call us at 773-442-4410.

Alternative Publications at NEIU

Over the years, a diverse number of newspapers, journals, pamphlets and flyers were published at the University by a variety of groups which included students, faculty and staff. These publications reflect the sentiments, issues, and at times, the turmoil such as the War in Vietnam and the student protests movement. These publications are an important record of the history of Northeastern Illinois University. If you have an interest in reading these items, you can contact the University Archives Office at 1(773) 442-4402.

Dario Villa
Associate Professor
University Archivist

Does the Library have my textbook?

With the beginning of the semester we have many students coming to the Library searching for textbooks and other curriculum materials. Here area few things for students and faculty to keep in mind about what the Library can and cannot offer:

  • The Library does not purchase and circulate textbooks in conjunction with course offerings. Certain textbooks may incidentally be in our collection, but this is fairly uncommon. If we do happen to have a textbook being used in a current class, there will most likely be only one circulating copy.
  • Textbooks can also occasionally be found in other library collections via the I-Share catalog, in which case students can request them for inter-library loan just like any other I-Share materials. However, please keep in mind that many schools have restrictions on lending out textbooks so requests for them can be slow to fulfill or even denied. Also, there’s a decent chance that several other students will request the same item, in which case only the first request will be fulfilled. As with any materials requested in I-Share, it’s always a good idea to follow the request’s progress by logging into your account.
  • If your teacher has informed you that curriculum materials are on course reserve, those items will be available for pickup from the circulation desk. More information on course reserve can be found here.
  • Teaching faculty interested in submitting materials for course reserve should visit Special Services for Faculty & Staff.

If you have any questions, please stop by the reference desk on the 1st floor or call us at 773-442-4410.

Women’s History Month Collection

For the month of March, American National Biography Online has put together a special collection celebrating Women’s History Month.

This small, highly selective set of articles is recommended by Oxford editors to help students get started doing research in this massive, 19,000-biography collection and The Oxford Companion to United States History encyclopedia content that supports it. Browse the list or start with an overview article and follow the links.

American National Biography Women’s History Month Collection

Coming Soon: New Computers and Furniture

Starting mid-July, computers and furniture throughout the library will be replaced. New computers on the second floor and the MLRC will be equipped with full MS Office, and computers in the MLRC will also have the latest Adobe Creative Suite.

Also, stay tuned for announcements regarding the upcoming library “Open House” which will take place sometime near the beginning of the Fall 2011 semester. New library resources, collections, and equipment will be highlighted.